Giving Back on Giving Tuesday

This time of year, it is important to us to show our appreciation for some of the many non-profit organizations that help conserve and protect the important biodiversity of our region, provide invaluable environmental education, and make the region a better place to live and explore.

Klamath-Siskiyou Native seeds is a small, rural, woman-led business that has a commitment to be ecologically and socially responsible in our business practices and to give back to the land and community that make our region so special and unique.

While providing native seeds for native plant and pollinator habitat restoration projects, running our business off of solar energy, and volunteering our own personal time for conservation and environmental efforts demonstrates our commitment to running a sustainable business and lifestyle, it is also important to take that commitment one step further and provide donations to non-profit organizations and community efforts that do amazing work in our region.

For some inspiration, we want to highlight some of the organizations we have supported during 2022 for Giving Tuesday: Siskiyou Field Institute, Applegate Siskiyou Alliance, Pollinator Project Rogue Valley & Pollinator Anthology, and Siskiyou Mountain Club.

 

Siskiyou Field Institute‘s mission is to increase the understanding of, and connection to the Klamath-Siskiyou ecoregion through education, scientific research, and public engagement. They provide field based learning in and about the Klamath-Siskiyou Region.
Applegate Siskiyou Alliance works to sustain the integrity of the environment and human communities in the Applegate Valley and surrounding areas through education, collaboration, community activism, stewardship and science. They promote wildland conservation, ecological restoration, a sustainable rural economy, and community engagement in federal land management planning.
Siskiyou Mountain Club’s mission is to restore, maintain, and promote primitive trails in the Siskiyou backcountry and beyond. They coordinate stewardship projects with volunteers, staff, and interns; publish maps and outdoor information, and lead service-adventure for the public. They coordinate with staff, volunteers, interns, and other partners who do the hard work it takes to keep trails from disappearing from the remote corners of Southwest Oregon and Northwest California. They participate in trips of varying length and put the labor in to keep our trails alive.